Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Show your joy - Psalm 125 v2 (Gradual Psalm No 7/3)

El Greco


2
V/NV
Tunc replétum est gáudio os nostrum: * et lingua nostra exsultatióne.
JH
Tunc implebitur risu os nostrum, et lingua nostra laude : 

τότε πλήσθη χαρς τ στόμα μν κα  γλσσα μν γαλλιάσεως 

tunc, adv. denoting a point of time which corresponds with another; then, at that time. as a subst.
repleo, plevi, pletum, ere 2, to fill, sate, satisfy
gaudium, ii,, joy, gladness, delight
os, oris, n., the mouth. 
lingua, ae, , the tongue; language, speech, tongue; plan, council. .
exsultatio, onis, joy, rejoicing, exultation

DR
Then was our mouth filled with gladness; and our tongue with joy.
Brenton
Then was our mouth filled with joy, and our tongue with exultation:
Grail
Then was our mouth filled with laughter, on our lips there were songs.
MD
Then our mouth was filled with gladness, and our tongue with jubilation.
RSV
Then our mouth was filled with laughter, and our tongue with shouts of joy;
Coverdale
Then was our mouth filled with laughter, and our tongue with joy.
Knox
in every mouth was laughter, joy was on every tongue.

Verse 2 of Psalm 125 takes us to the people's rejoicing at their liberation, and this is proper, as it reflects our proper attitude of gratitude towards God.

Cassiodorus tells us that the when referred to here (tunc) means the coming of Christ; but it can equally be applied, I think to his sacrifice that redeemed us:
Then means when the coming of the Lord Saviour, as has now been said, transformed our captivity into joy, our vices into virtues, our ignorance into knowledge of things divine, our death into eternal life, so that our mouth was rightly filled with gladness, and our tongue with joy, for such blessings were bestowed on us by the Lord's gift. Here mouth describes the hidden depth of the heart, where joys are first sown and sprout, and through the office of the tongue burst out into a harvest of words. It is the mouth which is referred to in: Taste, and see that the Lord is good!1 Even though his lips are closed, he cries out to the Lord, and the utterance of his remorseful heart is effectively heard, though his mouth is inactive.
 St Robert Bellarmine urges us always to show our joy:
this selfsame unspeakable consolation is always felt by those who are seri­ously converted to God, and, despising the hopes of this world, and abandoning all desire for the goods of this world, "direct their steps in the path of peace." 
They know the value of being rescued from the captivity of the devil, from the depths of the pit, and the being prepared for the enjoyment of true liberty and everlasting peace, through the call and the guidance of the Almighty. Interior joy will not fail to show itself externally, which it does by the expression of joy on the countenance and gladness on the tongue.
Rejoicing, he argues, is the proper reaction to God's action:

Rejoicing at liberation from captivity is no slight contribution to a change for the better. And who, he asks, does not rejoice at it? Their forebears, when liberated from Egypt and transferred from that awful slavery to freedom, under the influence of extreme ingratitude murmured in the midst of the very benefits, were dis­gruntled, indignant, and maintained their grief. This is not true of us, they claim: we rejoice and exult.

Psalm 125 (126)
Vulgate
Douay-Rheims
Canticum graduum.

 In converténdo Dóminus captivitátem Sion: * facti sumus sicut consoláti:
When the Lord brought back the captivity of Sion, we became like men comforted.
2  Tunc replétum est gáudio os nostrum: * et lingua nostra exsultatióne
2 Then was our mouth filled with gladness; and our tongue with joy.
3  Tunc dicent inter Gentes: * Magnificávit Dóminus fácere cum eis.
Then shall they say among the Gentiles: The Lord has done great things for them.
4  Magnificávit Dóminus fácere nobíscum: * facti sumus lætántes.
3 The Lord has done great things for us; we have become joyful.
5  Convérte, Dómine, captivitátem nostram, * sicut torrens in austro.
4 Turn again our captivity, O Lord, as a stream in the south.
6  Qui séminant in lácrimis, * in exsultatióne metent.
5 They that sow in tears shall reap in joy.

7  Eúntes ibant et flebant, * mitténtes sémina sua.
6 Going they went and wept, casting their seeds.
8  Veniéntes autem vénient cum exsultatióne, * portántes manípulos suos.
7 But coming they shall come with joyfulness, carrying their sheaves.
Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost
Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.






Tuesday, March 28, 2017

When Christ freed his people - Psalm 125 v1 (Gradual Psalm No 7/2)

c586, Syriac rabbula Gospels

The first verse of Psalm 125 announces that when God freed his people from captivity the captivity of sins, he also comforted them in their distress.  We can perhaps best view this as epitomised by Christ's action in entrusting his mother to St John's care while on the cross.

1
V
In converténdo Dóminus captivitátem Sion: * facti sumus sicut consoláti:
NV
In convertendo Dominus captivitatem Sion, facti sumus quasi somniantes.
JH
Cum conuerteret Dominus captiuitatem Sion, facti sumus quasi somniantes.

ἐν τῷ ἐπιστρέψαι κύριον τὴν αἰχμαλωσίαν Σιων ἐγενήθημεν ὡς παρακεκλημένοι

Text notes: St Jerome’s use of a cum clause here is perhaps easier for English speakers to translate than the gerund of the Vulgate, but most translations use ‘When’ in any case.  

There is some debate about the appropriateness of the word ‘captivitatem’ here – the Hebrew Massoretic Text implies more ‘lot’ or ‘fortunes’, and the RSV translates it accordingly as ‘When the Lord restored the fortunes of Sion’.  Others, however, see the word as a direct reference to the Babylonian captivity, thus, ‘When the Lord ended the captivity of Sion’.  

In the second phrase, the Masoretic text (followed by the Diurnal) is ‘like people dreaming’ – in the first half of the psalm, the people are perhaps waking from a joyous dream, or seeing a vision of what it will be like.  The Septuagint-Vulgate version though presents us with the idea of God as comforter, an image of the Holy Spirit and on the face of it reflects an alternative, and arguably better, manuscript tradition.

converto, verti, versum, ere 3,  to turn, change, alter, bring back, quicken, refresh, restore,  convert, turn from sin
captivitas, atis,   captivity,  captives;[ lot, fortunes]
consolor, atus sum, ari, to comfort, console, encourage

DR
When the Lord brought back the captivity of Sion, we became like men comforted.
B
When the Lord turned the captivity of Sion, we became as comforted ones.
G
When the Lord delivered Zion from bondage, it seemed like a dream.
MD
When the Lord ended the captivity of Sion, were then as in a dream.
RS
When the LORD restored the fortunes of Zion, we were like those who dream.
C
When the Lord turned again the captivity of Sion, then were we like unto them that dream.
K
When the Lord gave back Sion her banished sons, we walked like men in a dream;

Sion here is best interpreted as the Church, the people of God, held captive to sin.  Cassiodorus, for example, summarises St Augustine's take on the verse as follows:
It is clearly the captivity of the devil, under which the world was kept subject... But it gained the transformation of freedom when at the Lord's coming the bars of hell were burst asunder. 
That captivity, though, is always a threat to us, for in this life there is always the danger of falling into sin.  St John Chrysostom draws out the warning contained in the verse:
The one taken captive by sin, on the other hand, is in thrall to a pitiless and savage mistress, who im­poses the most menial of tasks; this form of tyranny is not accus­tomed to spare or to show mercy. Listen, for example, to how it took captive the wretched and miserable Judas without sparing him, turning him instead into a sacrilegious traitor; after he com­mitted his sin, it made a public display of him before the Jews and revealed his fault, not allowing him to reap the benefit of repen­tance, but snatching him from repentance to lead him to the noose. It is, you see, a harsh tyrant, imposing wicked commands, and shaming its subjects.
Hence, I beseech you, let us avoid its sway with great earnest­ness, fight against it without ever being reconciled to it, and once liberated from it remain at liberty. After all, if these people on being freed from savages were consoled, much more should we rejoice and exult on being liberated from sin, and maintain this undying joy instead of impairing and distorting it by becoming involved in the same vices,
We, though, have the promise of freedom from that captivity by virtue of Christ's sacrifice, the hope of salvation.  For that reason we can be filled with joy and relief even now.  As St Augustine puts it: 
Walk therefore in Christ, and sing rejoicing, sing as one that is comforted; because He went before you who has commanded you to follow Him.

Psalm 125 (126)
Vulgate
Douay-Rheims
Canticum graduum.

 In converténdo Dóminus captivitátem Sion: * facti sumus sicut consoláti:
When the Lord brought back the captivity of Sion, we became like men comforted.
2  Tunc replétum est gáudio os nostrum: * et lingua nostra exsultatióne
2 Then was our mouth filled with gladness; and our tongue with joy.
3  Tunc dicent inter Gentes: * Magnificávit Dóminus fácere cum eis.
Then shall they say among the Gentiles: The Lord has done great things for them.
4  Magnificávit Dóminus fácere nobíscum: * facti sumus lætántes.
3 The Lord has done great things for us; we have become joyful.
5  Convérte, Dómine, captivitátem nostram, * sicut torrens in austro.
4 Turn again our captivity, O Lord, as a stream in the south.
6  Qui séminant in lácrimis, * in exsultatióne metent.
5 They that sow in tears shall reap in joy.

7  Eúntes ibant et flebant, * mitténtes sémina sua.
6 Going they went and wept, casting their seeds.
8  Veniéntes autem vénient cum exsultatióne, * portántes manípulos suos.
7 But coming they shall come with joyfulness, carrying their sheaves.
Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost
Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.






Monday, March 27, 2017

Introduction to Psalm 125 - (Gradual Psalm No 7/1)

Biserica Ortodoxă din Deal, Cluj-Napoca), Romania.

Psalm 125 is the second of the second block of the Gradual Psalms when said devotionally, but in the Benedictine Office it opens weekday None.

Psalm 125: In convertendo Domino 
Vulgate
Douay-Rheims
Canticum graduum.

 In converténdo Dóminus captivitátem Sion: * facti sumus sicut consoláti:
When the Lord brought back the captivity of Sion, we became like men comforted.
2  Tunc replétum est gáudio os nostrum: * et lingua nostra exsultatióne
2 Then was our mouth filled with gladness; and our tongue with joy.
3  Tunc dicent inter Gentes: * Magnificávit Dóminus fácere cum eis.
Then shall they say among the Gentiles: The Lord has done great things for them.
4  Magnificávit Dóminus fácere nobíscum: * facti sumus lætántes.
3 The Lord has done great things for us; we have become joyful.
5  Convérte, Dómine, captivitátem nostram, * sicut torrens in austro.
4 Turn again our captivity, O Lord, as a stream in the south.
6  Qui séminant in lácrimis, * in exsultatióne metent.
5 They that sow in tears shall reap in joy.

7  Eúntes ibant et flebant, * mitténtes sémina sua.
6 Going they went and wept, casting their seeds.
8  Veniéntes autem vénient cum exsultatióne, * portántes manípulos suos.
7 But coming they shall come with joyfulness, carrying their sheaves.
Gloria Patri et Filio et Spiritui Sancto.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost
Sicut erat in principio, et nunc, et semper, et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.



Scriptural context: foreshadowing the reopening of heaven

Joy and the cross?

In the context of None there is something of a paradox associated with this psalm, since this psalm is about joy and comfort, whereas None is traditionally associated with the hour when Christ died on the Cross, when the Temple veil was torn in two by a dramatic earthquake.

The paradox is readily resolved though, if one considers St Benedict's constant orientation towards the Resurrection: as Our Lord pointed out immediately before the events of holy week, and alluded in verse 5, the seed has to die in order to bring forth new life.  Accordingly this psalm focuses on the triumph of the Cross, presenting us with the image of God as our comforter, who turns sorrow into joy.

Pope Benedict XVI’s commentary on this psalm at a General Audience developed this theme, drawing on St Bede:
….St Bede the Venerable (672/3-735), commenting on the words by which Jesus announced to his disciples the sorrow that lay in store for them, and at the same time the joy that would spring from their affliction (cf. Jn 16: 20). Bede recalls that "Those who loved Christ were weeping and mourning when they saw him captured by his enemies, bound, carried away for judgment, condemned, scourged, mocked and lastly crucified, pierced by the spear and buried. Instead, those who loved the world rejoiced... when they condemned to a most ignominious death the One of whom the sight alone they could not tolerate. The disciples were overcome by grief at the death of the Lord, but once they had learned of his Resurrection, their sorrow changed to joy; then when they had seen the miracle of the Ascension, they praised and blessed the Lord, filled with even greater joy, as the Evangelist Luke testified (cf. Lk 24: 53).”
Convert us O Lord

A number of modern commentators start from the reference to captivity to suggest that this psalm originated as a response to the return of the Exiles to Jerusalem after being freed by the Persians.  While that is certainly plausible, this view is entirely conjectural, and the sentiments, as St John Chrysostom points out, fit any number of historical occasions.  The real captivity that Scripture is pointing us to, surely, is our captivity to our sins, and in particular the legacy of Adam's sin, which locked mankind out of heaven.
  
In salvation history, the deliverance of the chosen people from Egypt and the return after the Babylonian captivity both foreshadow the spiritual sense of the psalm: St Augustine explains that Sion here really means heaven; our captivity is that due to sin which makes all of us in this world pilgrims rather than immediate citizens of the heavenly realm.  But due to Christ’s sacrifice on the cross, we are freed from the captivity of sin, and can rightly rejoice. 

There is though, perhaps a two stage process suggested in this psalm: verses 1-4 point to the things God has previously done for us, in reopening the way to heaven; but verses 5-7 can perhaps be interpreted as about us individually in the here and now, who still need to have Christ's redemption applied to us.  We have to sow through faith and good works, so that we can reap our reward through Christ.

Freedom from attachment to the things of this world

St Robert Bellarmine gives the reference to captivity a slightly different spin that I think is also worth considering, seeing it as a reference to attachment to the things of this world:also picks up this theme, warning us not to be too attached to our captivity to the world:
Having asked God to bring back all the captives to their country, he now addresses the captives themselves, and exhorts them not to be deterred by the labor of the journey, or to be detained by regard for any property they may have acquired in a foreign land, as they were sure to have much more and more valuable property in their own; and most happily compares them to the sower and the reaper… 
This applies peculiarly to us, pilgrims as we are; for those who are content with their captiv­ity, and are so engaged by the love of this world as never to think on their country, heaven; they look upon the road adopt­ed by the just to be nothing better than a positive loss and an injury. While the true exiles make all the haste they can to their country above; they freely give to the poor, who will never return what is given; they labor, without fee or reward, in teaching their brethren, as did the apostles; they freely renounce all manner of pleasure; all which seems the height of folly to those who know not what is to come of it, while, in real­ity, it is "sowing in tears," that they may afterwards, in due time, "reap in joy." 
And if they who are still so attached to their captivity, would seriously reflect on this, they certainly would change their mind, would begin to go up, and, no matter what it may cost them, they would sow the seed, that they may soon after reap it in joy in the kingdom of heaven.”


Friday, March 24, 2017

God's blessing on us - Psalm 133 v4

Paris, Bibl. Sainte-Geneviève, 1124

The final verse of Psalm 133 is a blessing that is similar to that of the priestly blessing found in Numbers 6:24.

4 
V/NV
Benedícat te Dóminus ex sion, * qui fecit cælum et terram.
JH
Benedicat tibi Dominus ex Sion,  factor caeli et terrae.


εὐλογήσει σε κύριος ἐκ Σιων ὁ ποιήσας τὸν οὐρανὸν καὶ τὴν γῆν

benedico, dixi, dictum, ere 3, to bless
Sion, Mt Zion, one of the hills on which Jerusalem was built.
facio, feci, factum, ere 3,  to make, do, cause, bring to pass
caelum, i, n., or caeli, orum, m.  heaven, the abode of God; the heavens as opposed to the earth
terra, ae, the earth, in both a lit. and a fig. sense. (a) orbis terrae, the world;  a country, esp. the Land of Israel

DR
May the Lord out of Sion bless you, he that made heaven and earth
B
May the Lord, who made heaven and earth, bless thee out of Sion.
MD
May the Lord bless thee from Sion: He Who made heaven and earth!
C
The Lord that made heaven and earth give thee blessing out of Sion.
RSV
May the LORD bless you from Zion, he who made heaven and earth!
K
May the Lord who dwells in Sion bless thee, the Lord who made heaven and earth!
G
May the Lord bless you from Zion, he who made both heaven and earth.

He blesses you, individually

The Latin here conveys something that the English cannot, namely the shift to you singular in this verse (te).  Cassiodorus, following St Augustine, sees it as a reference back to the previous psalm:
Earlier he used the plural throughout, but he now ended the psalm in the singular, so that once he had gathered his faithful brethren in unity, the gifts of blessing could be bestowed on the people who now loved the Lord. So if we wish to be blessed, the love of the holy Trinity and the unity of the blessed Church must enfold us.
St Augustine expands on this theme:
He exhorts many to bless, and Himself blesses one, because He makes one out of many, since "it is good and pleasant for brethren to dwell together in one." It is a plural number, brethren, and yet singular, to dwell together in one. Let none of you say, It comes not to me. Do you know of whom he speaks, "the Lord bless you out of Zion." He blessed one. Be one, and the blessing comes to you.
Creator and redeemer

 The final blessing, which can also be interpreted as that from the priests over the departing pilgrims at the literal level, serves as a reminder that God alone is our creator and redeemer.  Cassiodorus comments:
So if we wish to be blessed, the love of the holy Trinity and the unity of the blessed Church must enfold us. Observe too how aptly a perfect conclusion has enclosed this psalm; the person who has mounted up to the heavenly Jerusalem has received as reward a heavenly blessing.
St Jerome is more expansive on the image of Jerusalem:
You bless the Lord, the Lord blesses you….from the watchtower, from the Church, from true Christian doctrine, from devout faith….from the heavenly Jerusalem; in the mother of the first born, where the joys of the future are; where the archangels are; where the rest of the heavenly powers are; where the apostles, the prophets, the saints, the martyrs are; where throngs of angels and saints follow the Lamb wherever he goes…
Continuing the ascent

St Jerome though, also interprets the final words  as an exhortation to further effort, with heaven a reference to the saints, and earth to sinners.  Those who have reached the heights, he suggests, must not become complacent, for they can still fall.  And those who have not yet made the ascent, still have time to repent and reach heaven.

And so, let us resume our climb!


Image result for cathedral of monreale

 Psalm 133: Compline daily; Gradual Psalm No 15
Vulgate
Douay-Rheims
Canticum graduum
A gradual canticle
1 Ecce nunc benedícite Dóminum, * omnes servi Dómini
Behold now bless the Lord, all you servants of the Lord
2 Qui statis in domo Dómini, * in átriis domus Dei nostri.
Who stand in the house of the Lord, in the courts of the house of our God
3 In nóctibus extóllite manus vestras in sancta, * et benedícite Dóminum.
In the nights lift up your hands to the holy places, and bless the Lord.
4 Benedícat te Dóminus ex Sion, * qui fecit cælum et terram.
May the Lord out of Sion bless you, he that made heaven and earth.






Thursday, March 23, 2017

Lift up your hands with Christ on the cross - Psalm 133 v3


Cathedral of St Sophia, Kiev
Verse 3 of Psalm 133 presents us with the image of a person praying with uplifted hands, an image with rich Scriptural associations.

3
V
In nóctibus extóllite manus vestras in sancta, * et benedícite Dóminum.
NV
Extollite manus vestras ad sanctuarium et benedicite Dominum.
JH
Leuate manus uestras ad sanctum, et benedicite Domino


ἐν ταῖς νυξὶν ἐπάρατε τὰς χεῖρας ὑμῶν εἰς τὰ ἅγια καὶ εὐλογεῖτε τὸν κύριον

nox, noctis,  night.
extollo, extuli, ere 3, to lift up, raise up, exalt. 
manus, us, /.,  hand
sanctus, a, um,  holy; sanctuary
benedico, dixi, dictum, ere 3, to bless

DR
In the nights lift up your hands to the holy places, and bless the Lord.
B
Lift up your hands by night in the sanctuaries, and bless the Lord.
MD
At night lift up your hands to the sanctuary, and bless the Lord
C
Lift up your hands in the sanctuary, and praise the Lord.
RSV
Lift up your hands to the holy place, and bless the LORD!
K
lift up your hands towards the sanctuary and bless the Lord.
G
Lift up your hands to the holy place and bless the Lord through the night.

Lifting up in prayer

Read literally, lift up your hands (extollite manus vestras) is an exhortation to adopt an attitude of prayer.  Holy (in sancta) in this context surely means towards the sanctuary or Holy of Holies in the Temple.  This can be interpreted then as the pilgrims about to leave the Temple for the night asking the priests and Temple dwellers to pray on behalf of the people.

Lifting up one's hands though, has several other Scriptural connotations that the Fathers point to in relation to this psalm.  St Jerome, for example, points to the story of  Moses having his arms held up by other, for God had promises that as long as his hands were held up, the Israelites would advance:
While you are in this world, while you are in the nights, lift up your hands.  Do not let them down, but lift them up, raise them up with Moses.  If you lift up your hands, Amalec is conquered; if you lower them, Jesus is vanquished…
Moses, he argues, is a type of Christ on the cross:
Lift up your hands, the prophet says, because Jesus also lifted them up on the cross.
Good works

 St Jerome interprets hands as meaning good works:
...if we lift up our hands in good works, through our good works, Christ overcomes the devil.  Hands, moreover, connote works…
Cassiodorus takes this idea further, seeing it as an injunction to almsgiving:
Notice the significance of Lift up; it means “give more alms abundantly” for the Lord demands of us not only words of devotion but also deeds...In this way he teaches that love of the Lord is to be fulfilled both by sacred praises and by devoted works. When these have been performed, observe how worthy a recompense follows.
The spiritual night

At the literal level, prayer at night is particularly appropriate, as St John Chrysostom points out:
Why does he say at night?  To teach us to spend it all in sleep, and show us that prayers are purer at that time when the mind is clearer and more leisure is available.  …Now in a holy manner was well put, to show that in praying one should get rid of evil thoughts, of grudges, of avarice, of any other such sin that harms the mind.  
Night also has symbolic meaning though.  St Augustine suggests that it can mean in the bad times in our life, when we naturally struggle, citing the model of Job:
It is easy to bless by day. What is "by day"? In prosperity. For night is a sad thing, day a cheerful. When it is well with you, thou dost bless the Lord. Your son was sick, and he is made whole, thou dost bless the Lord. Your son was sick, perchance you have sought an astrologer, a soothsayer, perchance a curse against the Lord has come, not from your tongue, but from your deeds, from your deeds and your life. Boast not, because you bless with your tongue, if you curse with your life. Wherefore bless ye the Lord. 
When? By night. When did Job bless? When it was a sad night. All was taken away which he possessed; the children for whom his goods were stored were taken away. How sad was his night! Let us however see whether he blesses not in the night. "The Lord gave, the Lord has taken away; it is as the Lord willed; blessed be the name of the Lord."  And black was the night.…
More broadly, though, the night stands for the darkness of sin, sickness and adversity.  As St Jerome puts it:
 …The whole world is in the power of the evil one and ‘our wrestling is not against the flesh and blood, but against the world-rulers of this darkness.’  …This world is night; the future world is the true day…whether we will it or not, we are in the night; as long as we are in this world, we are in the hours of the night.  The night has darkness, the darkness of the sins of men.  … 

Towards the holy of holies

The reference to raising our arms towards the sanctuary can best, I think, be interpreted as a reminder to keep our eyes always firmly focused on heaven as our objective, and to bless God for the hope he gives us of everlasting life.

Above all, we bless the Lord, St John Chrysostom teaches, when we live well:
this most of all is properly conducted blessing, when your life is in harmony with your words, and through your deeds you glorify the God who made you…




 Psalm 133: Compline daily; Gradual Psalm No 15
Vulgate
Douay-Rheims
Canticum graduum
A gradual canticle
1 Ecce nunc benedícite Dóminum, * omnes servi Dómini
Behold now bless the Lord, all you servants of the Lord
2 Qui statis in domo Dómini, * in átriis domus Dei nostri.
Who stand in the house of the Lord, in the courts of the house of our God
3 In nóctibus extóllite manus vestras in sancta, * et benedícite Dóminum.
In the nights lift up your hands to the holy places, and bless the Lord.
4 Benedícat te Dóminus ex Sion, * qui fecit cælum et terram.
May the Lord out of Sion bless you, he that made heaven and earth.


And for the final part in this series on Psalm 133, go here.